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Call for Participation in Survey on Sustainable Mobility

04.08.2016

Sustainable mobility

The wider degrowth-community is asked to participate in a short survey on sustainable mobility which should not take more than 10-15 minutes: The results will be used as a part of Justin Hyatt´s academic work at the Institute for Housing and Urban Development Studies (IHS), Erasmus University, Rotterdam (Netherlands). It is also intended to publish and widely disseminate a separate report. 

Please also help by forwarding this survey in your network! The more answers are received - also from different parts of the world - the stronger and more powerful the final results will be.

Please submit by August 20 About the researcher: Justin Hyatt has been based in Budapest for many years, actively engaged in civil society initiatives, particularly related to transportation issues, such as the Critical Mass bicycle movement. He has also worked for the World Carfree Network and been involved with the Degrowth movement, attending several conferences as well as writing a stirring paper on urban mobility, and covering the 2014 degrowth conference in Leipzig with journalistic reporting
Currently Justin is pursuing a Masters degree in Urban Management and Development at the International Institute of Urban Management (IHS), a part of the Erasmus University in Rotterdam, the Netherlands. His research work involves looking at the strategies and experiences of organizations who are attempting to positively impact urban development, through ecological approaches to transport and spatial infrastructure. His research has taken him to Prague and New York. Justin plans to continue his work on eco-mobility and related topics, thus supporting cities and communities around the world to embrace more human and environmentally friendly transport systems and quality of urban life. Justin can be reached at justin@zofi.hu. About the survey: Sound and ecological transport systems together with spatial planning make up a fundamental building block of the degrowth approach. For urban infrastructure to be equitable and provide quality services for all, it will be necessary to engage in the "sustainable mobility paradigm". Modal shift - switching from car use to other forms of transport, such as cycling or public transport - is an important goal of many organizations and advocates of ecological mobility. Yet the most effective ways to bring about change and truly advance this mobility paradigm is not always straight forward, and thus a better understanding of how these objectives have found positive "windows of opportunity" or received support from government or society, can greatly benefit those advocates who would like to create real impact in their cities. Thus your ideas, preferences and experiences will make the results of this survey stronger and support a constructive build-up of knowledge! The results will be freely shared with all who are interested in it.

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